Fine Art Photography: Portrait in New Hope, PA, Steve Giovinco

This portrait, of me actually, was taken on the old canal in New Hope, PA, on the edge of the Delaware River.  I love the early morning summer light, and moved my body depending on how I literally felt the sun on my face and body.

Fine art photographer Steve Giovinco, New Hope, PA
Fine art photographer Steve Giovinco, New Hope, PA

Steve B. Smith At SVA: Lecture on his Fine Art Photography

The School of Visual Arts in New York Fine Art Photography Talk by Steven B. Smith

Fine art photography talk by Steve B. Smith at SVASteven B. Smith, a friend from graduate school, will be giving a talk about his work at SVA this Thursday at 7pm, at 209 East 23 Street, New York.  His work is great; I hope you can come.

From his Bio:

His photography chronicles the transition of the Western landscape into suburbia. He was awarded the First Book Prize for Photography by the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and his book, The Weather and a Place to Live: Photographs of the Suburban West, was published by Duke University Press in 2005. Smith has received Guggenheim and Aaron Siskind Fellowships and his work can be found in many public collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He received a BFA from Utah State University and a MFA from the Yale School of Art, has taught photography at Yale and Brown University and currently teaches in the photography department at Rhode Island School of Design. Q & A to follow the discussion. Presented by the Camera Club of New York.

AIPAD 2013 Photography Fair Coming up in April

Dont forget about AIPAD coming in early April.

The Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD), runs this April 4-7, 2013, and includes 75 fine art, contemporary and early photography dealers from around the world.

Hours:

Thursday, April 4 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Friday, April 5 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Saturday, April 6 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Address:

The Park Avenue Armory
643 Park Avenue
New York

SCOPE Art Fair 2013: Its Good and There is Photography

Yapci Ramos at Tinca Art Contemporary, at SCOPE NY 2013

Finally, I found some photography at the art fairs: Scope New York’s contemporary art fair in 2013.

The Armory Show 2013 had little photography, except for a few photo-centric galleries such as Yossi Milo, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Yancy Richardson Gallery.

But back to SCOPE New York International Contemporary Art Show.

In the past, I’m not sure I was a fan, but this version I liked.  Maybe its change in venue (Volta NY also moved this year, to 83 Mercer Street).  Maybe its the work that seemed to be consistently good, affordable, and interesting in a kind of messy, un-stuffy way.  You know what you’re getting at SCOPE: a rough-and-tumble fair, with a few gems hidden throughout the isles.  Some work is vulnerable of being derivative because of the mostly younger bent of the artists.

Anyway, here are a few highlights for me at SCOPE.

SCOPE NY Art Fair 2013, Masters & Pelavin
SCOPE NY Art Fair 2013, Masters & Pelavin

 

Yapci Ramos at Tinca Art Contemporary, at SCOPE NY 2013

 

SCOPE NY Art Fair, White Room Art System Gallery
Peter Demetz at White Room Art System, SCOPE NY Art Fair. Carved wood, acrylic paint, size 30"x25"x6"

 

 

 

 

 

Why Every Artist Should Visit the Contemporary Art Fairs In New York

Armory 2013 Contemporary Art FairThere has been much debate in the art world, especially among artists, about the merits or lack there of, of the art fair.

Currently, the Armory Show 2013 is in New York on the West Side piers.

What’s to like as an artist?  It’s cramped.  It’s hard to see work.  It’s a giant showroom.  Eyes glaze over after a few minutes.  But if work sells, artists can be more forgiving.

Here are a few reasons artist should attend the contemporary fairs.

It Is Your Industry

Yes, it’s a business.  The fairs are could be considered an abomination by some but they are the art industry’s “trade show.”  Lets call it what it is, as crass as that may sound.  And its important to be around your peers, galleriests, and collectors.

Spot Trends, for What it’s Worth

Armory 2013 Contemporary Art Fair. Adam Putnam (portrait). PPOW Gallery.
Armory 2013 Contemporary Art Fair. Adam Putnam (portrait). PPOW Gallery.

As an artist, it’s good to see what the current trends are, and fairs are a great way to take the pulse of the art world in a few hours or days.  See what’s there and then forget about it.  For example, this time around, there seems to be little photography in the booths.  What does that mean?  I don’t know, but it’s good to note it.  Does it mean I would stop being a photographer or shift my style?  Naturally, no.  But if I saw an artist somehow doing exactly what I was doing, I would need to know about it, for example, and maybe make adjustments.

See Who’s Showing Where

It might veer towards gossip but it’s good to know what galleries are showing what artists.  Maybe there’s a classmate from graduate school that you’ve lost touch will and see that they are showing at the Armory Show (reach out to them).  Or an artist you’ve been following has shift styles, and thus moved to another gallery.

Be Among Art

It’s just great to be among art, fellow artists, dealers, collectors, and art enthusiasts.  This point is actually very important, for me at least.  It helps me remember my main objective is to do my work, and the fair can be stimulating.

Think About Your Work

Armory 2013 Contemporary Art Fair, Mel Bochner. Two Palm Press
Armory 2013 Contemporary Art Fair, Mel Bochner. Two Palm Press

It’s also a time to think about your work.  For example, there might be a photographer that I see at the fair that I admire and like one of her pieces, but I would do something different.  Or I might look at the framing and see how I might change mine.  Or I could look at printing in a smaller size.

Imagine Your Work There

Lastly, it’s a great opportunity to think about your work being in a fair next year or on the gallery wall.  Who can you contact to show your work to?  Obviously, no one during the fair, but you often bump into someone who could be a great resource for your work.  It’s great to just think about what your work would look like hanging for others to see.

Why I Like Volta NY, The Contemporary Art Fair That Gets it Right

Of the several art fairs in town (the Armory Show 2013, Scope New York, The Independent), Volta NY gets it right.  Its even more right for the 2013 edition in its new location in SoHo.

Volta, unlike the other art fairs, allows only one artist per booth.  This mini-gallery experience makes viewing art much more like a gallery, cramped as it is.

Moving it away from Midtown to downtown is an asset.  It’s not as convenient, and the floor plan is more broken up compared to last year, but the feeling to view art is better here.

Here are a few things that I liked at Volta NY.

Volta NY.  Christine Ferichs at Gallery KM
Christine Ferichs at Gallery KM, Los Angeles

Christine Ferichs at Gallery KM, Los Angeles

Todd Lanam at Mark Wolfe Contemporary, San Francisco
Todd Lanam at Mark Wolfe Contemporary, San Francisco

Todd Lanam at Mark Wolfe Contemporary, San Francisco

Jock Mooney at Vane, Newcastle upon Tyne
Jock Mooney at Vane, Newcastle upon Tyne

Jock Mooney at Vane, Newcastle upon Tyne

John Stark at CHARLIE SMITH london, London
John Stark at CHARLIE SMITH london, London

John Stark at CHARLIE SMITH london, London

Naomi Safran-Hon at Slag Gallery, Brooklyn
Naomi Safran-Hon at Slag Gallery, Brooklyn

Naomi Safran-Hon at Slag Gallery, Brooklyn

Steve Viezens at Galerie Kleindienst, Leipzig
Steve Viezens at Galerie Kleindienst, Leipzig

Steve Viezens at Galerie Kleindienst, Leipzig

The Armory Show 2013: Seven Reasons Why Its Over

Armory Art Show 2013, opening night bar area
Armory Art Show 2013, opening night bar area

I’m not a basher of the art fairs.  I attend them dutifully when the contemporary art world descends on New York in March (and now May), and even migrated to Miami in December for Art Basel Miami Beach, where I insanely traversed 10 art fairs—some twice—during those four days.

The fairs, at a glance, provide a snapshot of the current art world trends, interests and work that is being produced and consumed.  I see the value.

So, like I said, I’m not a hater.  I enjoyed the Armory: Focus section a lot, by the way. And the Armory Show has risen from the ashes years ago when it was a tiny fair in the Gramercy Hotel and grew to the behemoth on the West Side piers.

But its time has come. The Armory is in trouble these days, and the 2013 edition is proof.

Here are seven reasons why the Armory Show is over.

Dearth of Big Galleries

The big galleries have stayed away, especially in 2013.  The roster of participants reads like Art Miami almost, and includes many galleries that have been at lesser fairs such as Scope and Pulse as recently as last season.  I love seeing interesting work but the Armory had the star power draw that it no longer has.

The Frieze Effect

Upstart Frieze Art Fair New York, although an upstart fair of only a year old, it seems to have greatly impacted the Armory Show.  It’s more obscure location became its asset and made attending an art fair a mini reprieve from the City.  The work was exemplary last year and look for the 2013 Frieze Art Fair New York to be even stronger now that people know about it.

Pier 92 is Secondary

Maybe I was tired, but secondary market was blooming on Pier 92, and it just looked like merch to me.  The carpet continued to make it seem like a depressing showroom.  Not a great place to see work.  And the quality seemed much lower this time around.

The Merchandise Mart-ization

Purchased a five years ago, MMPI, the parent company of Chicago’s Merchandise Mart, has been in charge of the Armory Fair. According to Galleriest NY, Louise Blouin has been in talks to purchase the Armory, so we’ll see.  Although the Mart recently trimmed the number of galleries, they initially expanded the fair to unmanageable proportions, and might have underestimated managing it.

American/New YorkFocused

Recently, the Armory has had less of an international presence.  The result has been a very American and New York focus.  The reason?  See 2 above.

Poor Location

It’s been at the Hudson River and 54 Street for years, but it is still extremely hard to get to.  Cab lines remain long, and the shuttle buses this year still seem very erratic.  Walking from the subway is a chore, especially with the prospect of standing for another two to six hours.

The Interwebs

This year Art.sy introduced a preview of work available before the fair opened.  As more and more work becomes available online, there is less of a reason to be first on line as the fair opens.  Look for more transactions in general to occur on the web, which could impact all the fairs.