Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France

I was honored to be an artist-in-residence in France and exhibit the photographs in a one person show I made there.

As an artist-in-residence, I continued my nightlandscape photographs in a Nineteenth Century villa in France. At the Château de l’Esparrou in Canet-en-Roussillon, I worked for a month photographing at night funded by the French government, Association of Cultural Encounter Centres (ACCR), culminating in a one person exhibition there.

Photographing Around the Chateau at Night

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Chateau Twilight

I photographed in the Chateau de l’Esparrou some afternoons and evenings, but I worked primarily outside in the surrounding areas.

This included the forest and pathways right behind the Chateau, as well as the vast vineyards and the large pond estuary, Etang de Canet-Saint Nazaire, located in the Pyrénées-Orientales region near Spain. About seven miles away was the French Catalonian city of Perpignan.

Haunting Beauty and Environmental Changes

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Environment

I wanted to capture haunting beauty of the place at night, as well as focus on the environmental changes happening in the estuary and vineyard (this is loosely connected to my other recent photographic projects focused on global warming set in Greenland and Broad Channel, Queens). Recent studies have shown that the region has experienced drier conditions and the vintner said yields were less as a result.

Working Twilight to 4am

Usually, I would work from twilight or sunset to around 4am. The exposures would be about 15 minutes to about an hour and a half. The moonlight was surprisingly bright at times, casting strange shadows through the trees and vineyards.

Walking in Complete Darkness

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Walking in Fear

I became fascinated with several sets of palm trees on the grounds of Château de l’Esparrou. Night after night I would return to photograph them–they seemed like totems or Roman columns. I would sit on the floor of the forest in contemplation, creating photos, with the only noise being occasional visits from curious packs of wild boars (“sangliers” in French–they can be somewhat dangerous but I would make noise to scare them away).

In complete darkness I would trek  to the pond estuary several miles away, where walking for an hour was usually fear-inducing. I got used to this and other walks in darkness on the grounds after a while.

Daily Working Routine

The daily routine for the month centered around my nightly photography.

As a result, my time spent in France was nearly nocturnal.

I got up around noon, roughly staying on New York time; reviewed some of the previous night’s work; strolled on the Canet-en-Roussillon beach to think about the upcoming night’s shoot; made something quick to eat and packed a sandwich for later; drove seven minutes to “work” at the Chateau at 5pm, photographed until around 10pm or midnight, taking a meal break at a bench there; continued photographing to about 4am; headed back to the beach apartment on empty streets to download the files making sure they are safe and undamaged; and headed to bed at 5am.

This process continued every day–I became obsessed–except for one when I was too exhausted to work.

Picasso and Art Diversion

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Perpignan

A few times I traveled to the beautiful but a bit gritty city of Perpignan to see a few art shows, such as one on Picasso, who lived in Perpignan for a few years. I spoke English rarely during the month.

Technical Photographic Concerns

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Technical Problems

There were several technical issues that came up due to the nearly complete darkness I often photographed in. The biggest problem was distortion or noise appearing in the digital photographic files, often in the shadow areas. Due to the extreme low light, exposures had to be very long to provide a good undistorted file. Another problem, on occasion,  was wind which could move the tripod slightly, making the image drop out of focus. As a result, sharpening in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop–always important–became crucial.

Exhibition of Night Photos of the Chateau

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, ShowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Canet Opening

About two and a half weeks into the residency, I began to prepare for an exhibition scheduled for a week later.

I quickly looked through about a thousand photos I had taken to date, whittled the selection down to fifteen large format 120×80 cm/48”x40” prints, which I edited, color corrected and sharpened. These were then printed, mounted and framed for a one person exhibition–normally a process that can take three months to a year, but due to time constraints, took about a week.

The show was presented in a stunning 17th Century stable converted to an exhibition space in historic Canet. Many people came, along with local government officials; I gave a brief speech in (very) broken French.

Other Work: VR and 360 Video

Beyond the digital photographs–the total number taken during the four weeks was about two thousand–I also experimented with 360 degree video and virtual reality. Using a RICOH Theta S 360, I created VR and 360 videos of the interior of the Château de l’Esparrou and low-light night landscapes in the vineyard.

The concept for using VR and 360 video was to create an personal experience using new image making technology. Because there was no single perspective as there is with a traditional camera, placing the lens in a place that captured the feeling of the environment became an unusual creative challenge.

An Unusual Residency

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Unusual Residency

At other residencies I’ve attended such as Yaddo and Ucross, artists have a studio to work in, a room, are provided with meals with mandatory communal dinners–in short, a shared experience.

What I experienced at the Chateau was more of an artist-in-residence: I worked alone, prepared my own meals, was given an off-site apartment (the Mediterranean ocean was across the street), was given a car, but did not have a designated studio. However, I was given a stipend for meals and other expenses and was paid for travel to and from France.

Also unusual was to have the owner of the Chateau there, on site. This personal connection to the place brought a different level of intimacy to the experience–and my work. Although being an artist-in-residence was different (and occasionally lonely), ultimately the unbridled freedom allowed me to concentrate completely on my creative process.

Paris Trip and Contemporary Museum Meeting

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Contemporary Museum Meeting

After the residency, I took the night train to Paris. I was a bit concerned that I would appear groggy and disheveled for my morning appointment with a contemporary art museum curator, but after a change of shirts, I felt fine.

The meeting went well and the curator was kind enough to recommend four other contacts in Paris and France who might be interested in my work. I set out pursuing them and other meetings in Paris with galleries for the next few days, and finally headed back to New York after five weeks.

Inspiration from Painting and Film

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: RousseauArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Corot

Before I left for France, I visited the Metropolitan Museum to see Barbizon landscape painters, including Théodore Rousseau and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, and other favorite artists such as Frederic Edwin Church, who I love for his sweeping landscapes and atmospheric light. I also made sure to see photographs of Eugene Atget and Eugène Cuvelier. These paintings and photographs are touchstones for me that I return to often.

Project Support

The project was supported by the Association des Centre culturel de rencontre (ACCR), a French government organization, which promotes cultural diversity, and the Centre Culturel de Rencontre (CCR). They provided housing, transportation, a stipend and the production and exhibition of photographs.

Thanks to Château de l’Esparrou

I loved my time at the Chateau. Having the freedom to create new work unencumbered is a dream for any artist. I am grateful to the Château de l’Esparrou and especially Bertille de Swarte, who grew up there and manages it now, and the funding from the French government.

One Person Exhibition

Here is some of the work–there were a total of fifteen framed 48×40″ photographs–I created at the Château de l’Esparrou and exhibited as a one person show in France  in the Fall of 2017.

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Lone TreeArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Totem Palm Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees Yellow LightArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees YellowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Palms Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees in CageArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Vineyards WestArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Moon

 

 

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France

I was honored to be an artist-in-residence in France and exhibit the photographs in a one person show I made there.

As an artist-in-residence, I continued my nightlandscape photographs in a Nineteenth Century villa in France. At the Château de l’Esparrou in Canet-en-Roussillon, I worked for a month photographing at night funded by the French government, Association of Cultural Encounter Centres (ACCR), culminating in a one person exhibition there.

Photographing Around the Chateau at Night

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Chateau Twilight

I photographed in the Chateau de l’Esparrou some afternoons and evenings, but I worked primarily outside in the surrounding areas.

This included the forest and pathways right behind the Chateau, as well as the vast vineyards and the large pond estuary, Etang de Canet-Saint Nazaire, located in the Pyrénées-Orientales region near Spain. About seven miles away was the French Catalonian city of Perpignan.

Haunting Beauty and Environmental Changes

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Environment

I wanted to capture haunting beauty of the place at night, as well as focus on the environmental changes happening in the estuary and vineyard (this is loosely connected to my other recent photographic projects focused on global warming set in Greenland and Broad Channel, Queens). Recent studies have shown that the region has experienced drier conditions and the vintner said yields were less as a result.

Working Twilight to 4am

Usually, I would work from twilight or sunset to around 4am. The exposures would be about 15 minutes to about an hour and a half. The moonlight was surprisingly bright at times, casting strange shadows through the trees and vineyards.

Walking in Complete Darkness

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Walking in Fear

I became fascinated with several sets of palm trees on the grounds of Château de l’Esparrou. Night after night I would return to photograph them–they seemed like totems or Roman columns. I would sit on the floor of the forest in contemplation, creating photos, with the only noise being occasional visits from curious packs of wild boars (“sangliers” in French–they can be somewhat dangerous but I would make noise to scare them away).

In complete darkness I would trek  to the pond estuary several miles away, where walking for an hour was usually fear-inducing. I got used to this and other walks in darkness on the grounds after a while.

Daily Working Routine

The daily routine for the month centered around my nightly photography.

As a result, my time spent in France was nearly nocturnal.

I got up around noon, roughly staying on New York time; reviewed some of the previous night’s work; strolled on the Canet-en-Roussillon beach to think about the upcoming night’s shoot; made something quick to eat and packed a sandwich for later; drove seven minutes to “work” at the Chateau at 5pm, photographed until around 10pm or midnight, taking a meal break at a bench there; continued photographing to about 4am; headed back to the beach apartment on empty streets to download the files making sure they are safe and undamaged; and headed to bed at 5am.

This process continued every day–I became obsessed–except for one when I was too exhausted to work.

Picasso and Art Diversion

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Perpignan

A few times I traveled to the beautiful but a bit gritty city of Perpignan to see a few art shows, such as one on Picasso, who lived in Perpignan for a few years. I spoke English rarely during the month.

Technical Photographic Concerns

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Technical Problems

There were several technical issues that came up due to the nearly complete darkness I often photographed in. The biggest problem was distortion or noise appearing in the digital photographic files, often in the shadow areas. Due to the extreme low light, exposures had to be very long to provide a good undistorted file. Another problem, on occasion,  was wind which could move the tripod slightly, making the image drop out of focus. As a result, sharpening in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop–always important–became crucial.

Exhibition of Night Photos of the Chateau

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, ShowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Canet Opening

About two and a half weeks into the residency, I began to prepare for an exhibition scheduled for a week later.

I quickly looked through about a thousand photos I had taken to date, whittled the selection down to fifteen large format 120×80 cm/48”x40” prints, which I edited, color corrected and sharpened. These were then printed, mounted and framed for a one person exhibition–normally a process that can take three months to a year, but due to time constraints, took about a week.

The show was presented in a stunning 17th Century stable converted to an exhibition space in historic Canet. Many people came, along with local government officials; I gave a brief speech in (very) broken French.

Other Work: VR and 360 Video

Beyond the digital photographs–the total number taken during the four weeks was about two thousand–I also experimented with 360 degree video and virtual reality. Using a RICOH Theta S 360, I created VR and 360 videos of the interior of the Château de l’Esparrou and low-light night landscapes in the vineyard.

The concept for using VR and 360 video was to create an personal experience using new image making technology. Because there was no single perspective as there is with a traditional camera, placing the lens in a place that captured the feeling of the environment became an unusual creative challenge.

An Unusual Residency

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Unusual Residency

At other residencies I’ve attended such as Yaddo and Ucross, artists have a studio to work in, a room, are provided with meals with mandatory communal dinners–in short, a shared experience.

What I experienced at the Chateau was more of an artist-in-residence: I worked alone, prepared my own meals, was given an off-site apartment (the Mediterranean ocean was across the street), was given a car, but did not have a designated studio. However, I was given a stipend for meals and other expenses and was paid for travel to and from France.

Also unusual was to have the owner of the Chateau there, on site. This personal connection to the place brought a different level of intimacy to the experience–and my work. Although being an artist-in-residence was different (and occasionally lonely), ultimately the unbridled freedom allowed me to concentrate completely on my creative process.

Paris Trip and Contemporary Museum Meeting

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Contemporary Museum Meeting

After the residency, I took the night train to Paris. I was a bit concerned that I would appear groggy and disheveled for my morning appointment with a contemporary art museum curator, but after a change of shirts, I felt fine.

The meeting went well and the curator was kind enough to recommend four other contacts in Paris and France who might be interested in my work. I set out pursuing them and other meetings in Paris with galleries for the next few days, and finally headed back to New York after five weeks.

Inspiration from Painting and Film

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: RousseauArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Corot

Before I left for France, I visited the Metropolitan Museum to see Barbizon landscape painters, including Théodore Rousseau and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, and other favorite artists such as Frederic Edwin Church, who I love for his sweeping landscapes and atmospheric light. I also made sure to see photographs of Eugene Atget and Eugène Cuvelier. These paintings and photographs are touchstones for me that I return to often.

Project Support

The project was supported by the Association des Centre culturel de rencontre (ACCR), a French government organization, which promotes cultural diversity, and the Centre Culturel de Rencontre (CCR). They provided housing, transportation, a stipend and the production and exhibition of photographs.

Thanks to Château de l’Esparrou

I loved my time at the Chateau. Having the freedom to create new work unencumbered is a dream for any artist. I am grateful to the Château de l’Esparrou and especially Bertille de Swarte, who grew up there and manages it now, and the funding from the French government.

One Person Exhibition

Here is some of the work–there were a total of fifteen framed 48×40″ photographs–I created at the Château de l’Esparrou and exhibited as a one person show in France  in the Fall of 2017.

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Lone TreeArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Totem Palm Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees Yellow LightArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees YellowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Palms Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees in CageArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Vineyards WestArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Moon

 

 

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France

I was honored to be an artist-in-residence in France and exhibit the photographs in a one person show I made there.

As an artist-in-residence, I continued my nightlandscape photographs in a Nineteenth Century villa in France. At the Château de l’Esparrou in Canet-en-Roussillon, I worked for a month photographing at night funded by the French government, Association of Cultural Encounter Centres (ACCR), culminating in a one person exhibition there.

Photographing Around the Chateau at Night

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Chateau Twilight

I photographed in the Chateau de l’Esparrou some afternoons and evenings, but I worked primarily outside in the surrounding areas.

This included the forest and pathways right behind the Chateau, as well as the vast vineyards and the large pond estuary, Etang de Canet-Saint Nazaire, located in the Pyrénées-Orientales region near Spain. About seven miles away was the French Catalonian city of Perpignan.

Haunting Beauty and Environmental Changes

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Environment

I wanted to capture haunting beauty of the place at night, as well as focus on the environmental changes happening in the estuary and vineyard (this is loosely connected to my other recent photographic projects focused on global warming set in Greenland and Broad Channel, Queens). Recent studies have shown that the region has experienced drier conditions and the vintner said yields were less as a result.

Working Twilight to 4am

Usually, I would work from twilight or sunset to around 4am. The exposures would be about 15 minutes to about an hour and a half. The moonlight was surprisingly bright at times, casting strange shadows through the trees and vineyards.

Walking in Complete Darkness

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Walking in Fear

I became fascinated with several sets of palm trees on the grounds of Château de l’Esparrou. Night after night I would return to photograph them–they seemed like totems or Roman columns. I would sit on the floor of the forest in contemplation, creating photos, with the only noise being occasional visits from curious packs of wild boars (“sangliers” in French–they can be somewhat dangerous but I would make noise to scare them away).

In complete darkness I would trek  to the pond estuary several miles away, where walking for an hour was usually fear-inducing. I got used to this and other walks in darkness on the grounds after a while.

Daily Working Routine

The daily routine for the month centered around my nightly photography.

As a result, my time spent in France was nearly nocturnal.

I got up around noon, roughly staying on New York time; reviewed some of the previous night’s work; strolled on the Canet-en-Roussillon beach to think about the upcoming night’s shoot; made something quick to eat and packed a sandwich for later; drove seven minutes to “work” at the Chateau at 5pm, photographed until around 10pm or midnight, taking a meal break at a bench there; continued photographing to about 4am; headed back to the beach apartment on empty streets to download the files making sure they are safe and undamaged; and headed to bed at 5am.

This process continued every day–I became obsessed–except for one when I was too exhausted to work.

Picasso and Art Diversion

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Perpignan

A few times I traveled to the beautiful but a bit gritty city of Perpignan to see a few art shows, such as one on Picasso, who lived in Perpignan for a few years. I spoke English rarely during the month.

Technical Photographic Concerns

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Technical Problems

There were several technical issues that came up due to the nearly complete darkness I often photographed in. The biggest problem was distortion or noise appearing in the digital photographic files, often in the shadow areas. Due to the extreme low light, exposures had to be very long to provide a good undistorted file. Another problem, on occasion,  was wind which could move the tripod slightly, making the image drop out of focus. As a result, sharpening in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop–always important–became crucial.

Exhibition of Night Photos of the Chateau

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, ShowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Canet Opening

About two and a half weeks into the residency, I began to prepare for an exhibition scheduled for a week later.

I quickly looked through about a thousand photos I had taken to date, whittled the selection down to fifteen large format 120×80 cm/48”x40” prints, which I edited, color corrected and sharpened. These were then printed, mounted and framed for a one person exhibition–normally a process that can take three months to a year, but due to time constraints, took about a week.

The show was presented in a stunning 17th Century stable converted to an exhibition space in historic Canet. Many people came, along with local government officials; I gave a brief speech in (very) broken French.

Other Work: VR and 360 Video

Beyond the digital photographs–the total number taken during the four weeks was about two thousand–I also experimented with 360 degree video and virtual reality. Using a RICOH Theta S 360, I created VR and 360 videos of the interior of the Château de l’Esparrou and low-light night landscapes in the vineyard.

The concept for using VR and 360 video was to create an personal experience using new image making technology. Because there was no single perspective as there is with a traditional camera, placing the lens in a place that captured the feeling of the environment became an unusual creative challenge.

An Unusual Residency

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Unusual Residency

At other residencies I’ve attended such as Yaddo and Ucross, artists have a studio to work in, a room, are provided with meals with mandatory communal dinners–in short, a shared experience.

What I experienced at the Chateau was more of an artist-in-residence: I worked alone, prepared my own meals, was given an off-site apartment (the Mediterranean ocean was across the street), was given a car, but did not have a designated studio. However, I was given a stipend for meals and other expenses and was paid for travel to and from France.

Also unusual was to have the owner of the Chateau there, on site. This personal connection to the place brought a different level of intimacy to the experience–and my work. Although being an artist-in-residence was different (and occasionally lonely), ultimately the unbridled freedom allowed me to concentrate completely on my creative process.

Paris Trip and Contemporary Museum Meeting

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Contemporary Museum Meeting

After the residency, I took the night train to Paris. I was a bit concerned that I would appear groggy and disheveled for my morning appointment with a contemporary art museum curator, but after a change of shirts, I felt fine.

The meeting went well and the curator was kind enough to recommend four other contacts in Paris and France who might be interested in my work. I set out pursuing them and other meetings in Paris with galleries for the next few days, and finally headed back to New York after five weeks.

Inspiration from Painting and Film

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: RousseauArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Corot

Before I left for France, I visited the Metropolitan Museum to see Barbizon landscape painters, including Théodore Rousseau and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, and other favorite artists such as Frederic Edwin Church, who I love for his sweeping landscapes and atmospheric light. I also made sure to see photographs of Eugene Atget and Eugène Cuvelier. These paintings and photographs are touchstones for me that I return to often.

Project Support

The project was supported by the Association des Centre culturel de rencontre (ACCR), a French government organization, which promotes cultural diversity, and the Centre Culturel de Rencontre (CCR). They provided housing, transportation, a stipend and the production and exhibition of photographs.

Thanks to Château de l’Esparrou

I loved my time at the Chateau. Having the freedom to create new work unencumbered is a dream for any artist. I am grateful to the Château de l’Esparrou and especially Bertille de Swarte, who grew up there and manages it now, and the funding from the French government.

One Person Exhibition

Here is some of the work–there were a total of fifteen framed 48×40″ photographs–I created at the Château de l’Esparrou and exhibited as a one person show in France  in the Fall of 2017.

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Lone TreeArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Totem Palm Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees Yellow LightArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees YellowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Palms Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees in CageArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Vineyards WestArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Moon

 

 

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France

I was honored to be an artist-in-residence in France and exhibit the photographs in a one person show I made there.

As an artist-in-residence, I continued my nightlandscape photographs in a Nineteenth Century villa in France. At the Château de l’Esparrou in Canet-en-Roussillon, I worked for a month photographing at night funded by the French government, Association of Cultural Encounter Centres (ACCR), culminating in a one person exhibition there.

Photographing Around the Chateau at Night

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Chateau Twilight

I photographed in the Chateau de l’Esparrou some afternoons and evenings, but I worked primarily outside in the surrounding areas.

This included the forest and pathways right behind the Chateau, as well as the vast vineyards and the large pond estuary, Etang de Canet-Saint Nazaire, located in the Pyrénées-Orientales region near Spain. About seven miles away was the French Catalonian city of Perpignan.

Haunting Beauty and Environmental Changes

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Environment

I wanted to capture haunting beauty of the place at night, as well as focus on the environmental changes happening in the estuary and vineyard (this is loosely connected to my other recent photographic projects focused on global warming set in Greenland and Broad Channel, Queens). Recent studies have shown that the region has experienced drier conditions and the vintner said yields were less as a result.

Working Twilight to 4am

Usually, I would work from twilight or sunset to around 4am. The exposures would be about 15 minutes to about an hour and a half. The moonlight was surprisingly bright at times, casting strange shadows through the trees and vineyards.

Walking in Complete Darkness

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Walking in Fear

I became fascinated with several sets of palm trees on the grounds of Château de l’Esparrou. Night after night I would return to photograph them–they seemed like totems or Roman columns. I would sit on the floor of the forest in contemplation, creating photos, with the only noise being occasional visits from curious packs of wild boars (“sangliers” in French–they can be somewhat dangerous but I would make noise to scare them away).

In complete darkness I would trek  to the pond estuary several miles away, where walking for an hour was usually fear-inducing. I got used to this and other walks in darkness on the grounds after a while.

Daily Working Routine

The daily routine for the month centered around my nightly photography.

As a result, my time spent in France was nearly nocturnal.

I got up around noon, roughly staying on New York time; reviewed some of the previous night’s work; strolled on the Canet-en-Roussillon beach to think about the upcoming night’s shoot; made something quick to eat and packed a sandwich for later; drove seven minutes to “work” at the Chateau at 5pm, photographed until around 10pm or midnight, taking a meal break at a bench there; continued photographing to about 4am; headed back to the beach apartment on empty streets to download the files making sure they are safe and undamaged; and headed to bed at 5am.

This process continued every day–I became obsessed–except for one when I was too exhausted to work.

Picasso and Art Diversion

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Perpignan

A few times I traveled to the beautiful but a bit gritty city of Perpignan to see a few art shows, such as one on Picasso, who lived in Perpignan for a few years. I spoke English rarely during the month.

Technical Photographic Concerns

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Technical Problems

There were several technical issues that came up due to the nearly complete darkness I often photographed in. The biggest problem was distortion or noise appearing in the digital photographic files, often in the shadow areas. Due to the extreme low light, exposures had to be very long to provide a good undistorted file. Another problem, on occasion,  was wind which could move the tripod slightly, making the image drop out of focus. As a result, sharpening in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop–always important–became crucial.

Exhibition of Night Photos of the Chateau

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, ShowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, Canet Opening

About two and a half weeks into the residency, I began to prepare for an exhibition scheduled for a week later.

I quickly looked through about a thousand photos I had taken to date, whittled the selection down to fifteen large format 120×80 cm/48”x40” prints, which I edited, color corrected and sharpened. These were then printed, mounted and framed for a one person exhibition–normally a process that can take three months to a year, but due to time constraints, took about a week.

The show was presented in a stunning 17th Century stable converted to an exhibition space in historic Canet. Many people came, along with local government officials; I gave a brief speech in (very) broken French.

Other Work: VR and 360 Video

Beyond the digital photographs–the total number taken during the four weeks was about two thousand–I also experimented with 360 degree video and virtual reality. Using a RICOH Theta S 360, I created VR and 360 videos of the interior of the Château de l’Esparrou and low-light night landscapes in the vineyard.

The concept for using VR and 360 video was to create an personal experience using new image making technology. Because there was no single perspective as there is with a traditional camera, placing the lens in a place that captured the feeling of the environment became an unusual creative challenge.

An Unusual Residency

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Unusual Residency

At other residencies I’ve attended such as Yaddo and Ucross, artists have a studio to work in, a room, are provided with meals with mandatory communal dinners–in short, a shared experience.

What I experienced at the Chateau was more of an artist-in-residence: I worked alone, prepared my own meals, was given an off-site apartment (the Mediterranean ocean was across the street), was given a car, but did not have a designated studio. However, I was given a stipend for meals and other expenses and was paid for travel to and from France.

Also unusual was to have the owner of the Chateau there, on site. This personal connection to the place brought a different level of intimacy to the experience–and my work. Although being an artist-in-residence was different (and occasionally lonely), ultimately the unbridled freedom allowed me to concentrate completely on my creative process.

Paris Trip and Contemporary Museum Meeting

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Contemporary Museum Meeting

After the residency, I took the night train to Paris. I was a bit concerned that I would appear groggy and disheveled for my morning appointment with a contemporary art museum curator, but after a change of shirts, I felt fine.

The meeting went well and the curator was kind enough to recommend four other contacts in Paris and France who might be interested in my work. I set out pursuing them and other meetings in Paris with galleries for the next few days, and finally headed back to New York after five weeks.

Inspiration from Painting and Film

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: RousseauArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Corot

Before I left for France, I visited the Metropolitan Museum to see Barbizon landscape painters, including Théodore Rousseau and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, and other favorite artists such as Frederic Edwin Church, who I love for his sweeping landscapes and atmospheric light. I also made sure to see photographs of Eugene Atget and Eugène Cuvelier. These paintings and photographs are touchstones for me that I return to often.

Project Support

The project was supported by the Association des Centre culturel de rencontre (ACCR), a French government organization, which promotes cultural diversity, and the Centre Culturel de Rencontre (CCR). They provided housing, transportation, a stipend and the production and exhibition of photographs.

Thanks to Château de l’Esparrou

I loved my time at the Chateau. Having the freedom to create new work unencumbered is a dream for any artist. I am grateful to the Château de l’Esparrou and especially Bertille de Swarte, who grew up there and manages it now, and the funding from the French government.

One Person Exhibition

Here is some of the work–there were a total of fifteen framed 48×40″ photographs–I created at the Château de l’Esparrou and exhibited as a one person show in France  in the Fall of 2017.

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Lone TreeArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Totem Palm Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees Yellow LightArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees YellowArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Palms Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees in CageArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Vineyards WestArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Moon

 

 

Artiste en résidence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition en France

J’ai eu l’honneur d’être artiste en résidence en France et d’exposer le travail dans une exposition personnelle que j’ai faite là-bas.

En tant qu’artiste résidente, j’ai continué mes photographies nocturnes dans une villa du XIXème siècle en France. Au Château de l’Esparrou à Canet-en-Roussillon, j’ai travaillé pendant un mois à photographier la nuit financée par le gouvernement français, ACCR, ce qui a donné lieu à une exposition personnelle.

Photographier autour du château la nuit

Copy of 20170905_173412J’ai photographié au Château de l’Esparrou quelques après-midi et soirées, mais j’ai surtout travaillé dans les environs.

Cela comprenait la forêt et les sentiers juste derrière le château ainsi que les vastes vignobles et l’étang de Canet-Saint Nazaire, situé dans les Pyrénées-Orientales près de l’Espagne. A environ sept milles se trouvait la ville catalane de Perpignan.

Haunting Beauty et les changements environnementaux

Je voulais montrer la beauté obsédante de l’endroit la nuit, ainsi que me concentrer sur les changements environnementaux qui se produisent dans l’estuaire et le vignoble (cela est lié à mes autres projets photographiques récents axés sur le réchauffement climatique au Groenland et Broad Channel, Queens) . Des études récentes ont montré que la région a connu des conditions plus sèches et le vigneron a déclaré que les rendements étaient moins élevés.

Du crépuscule à 5 heures du matin

Habituellement, je travaillerais du crépuscule ou du coucher du soleil vers 4 heures du matin. Les expositions seraient d’environ 15 minutes à environ une heure et demie. Le clair de lune était étonnamment lumineux parfois, encadrant étrangement étranges ombres à travers les arbres et les vignes.

Marcher dans l’obscurité complète dans la peur

J'ai photographié au Château français de la nuit du 19ème siècle. C'est comme ça que ça ressemble luneJe me suis fasciné avec plusieurs ensembles de palmiers sur le terrain du Château de l’Esparrou. J’y retournerais nuit après nuit pour les photographier – ils ressemblaient à des totems ou des colonnes romaines. Je m’asseyais sur le sol de la forêt presque en méditation silencieuse en regardant et en créant des photos, le seul bruit étant des visites occasionnelles de curieux paquets de sangliers (sangliers en français – ils peuvent être un peu dangereux mais je ferais du bruit à les effrayer).

Je marcherais aussi dans l’obscurité totale jusqu’à l’estuaire de l’étang, à plusieurs kilomètres, où marcher pendant une heure était généralement une source de peur. Je me suis habitué à cela et d’autres promenades sur les motifs après un certain temps, cependant.

Routine de travail quotidienne

La routine quotidienne du mois consistait à créer de nouvelles photos la nuit.
En conséquence, mon temps passé en France était presque nocturne.

Habituellement, je me suis levé à midi, restant à peu près à l’heure de New York; passé en revue une partie du travail de la nuit précédente; flâné sur la plage de Canet-en-Roussillon pour réfléchir au tournage de la nuit prochaine; fait quelque chose de rapide à manger et emballé un sandwich pour plus tard; a conduit sept minutes pour «travailler» au château à 17 heures, photographié jusqu’à environ 22 heures ou minuit, prenant une pause repas sur un banc là-bas; continué à photographier à environ 4 heures du matin; retourné à l’appartement de la plage conduisant les rues vides pour télécharger les fichiers en s’assurant qu’ils sont en sécurité et intacts; et dirigé au lit à 5 heures du matin.

Ce processus a continué tous les jours – je suis devenu obsédé – à l’exception d’un quand j’étais trop fatigué pour travailler.

Diversion d’Art Picasso

Quelques fois, je me suis rendu dans la belle mais un peu graveleuse ville de Perpignan pour voir quelques expositions d’art, comme celle de Picasso, qui a vécu à Perpignan pendant quelques années. Je parlais rarement l’anglais au cours du mois.Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Perpignan

Préoccupations photographiques

Il y a eu plusieurs problèmes techniques à cause de l’obscurité presque complète que j’ai souvent photographiée. Le plus gros problème était la distorsion ou le bruit apparaissant dans les fichiers photographiques numériques, souvent dans les zones sombres d’ombre. En raison de la lumière extrêmement faible, les expositions devaient être très longues pour fournir un bon fichier non déformé. Un autre problème était parfois le vent qui pouvait déplacer le trépied légèrement, ce qui rend l’image floue. En conséquence, l’accentuation d’Adobe Camera Raw et Photoshop – toujours importante – est devenue particulièrement cruciale.

Exposition de photos de nuit du château

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, ShowEnviron deux semaines et demie dans la résidence, j’ai commencé à préparer une exposition prévue pour une semaine plus tard.

J’ai rapidement regardé à travers environ un millier de photos que j’avais prises à ce jour, réduisait la sélection à quinze impressions grand format 120x80cm / 48 “x40”, que j’ai éditées, corrigées et aiguisées. Ceux-ci ont ensuite été imprimés, montés et encadrés pour une exposition d’une personne – normalement un processus qui peut prendre trois mois à un an, mais en raison des contraintes de temps, a été comprimé jusqu’à environ une semaine.

Le spectacle a été présenté dans un magnifique espace d’exposition stable du XVIIe siècle dans le quartier historique de Canet. De nombreuses personnes sont venues, avec des représentants du gouvernement local; J’ai fait un bref discours en français brisé.

Autre travail: Vidéo VR et 360

Au-delà des photographies numériques – le nombre total de prises pendant les quatre semaines était d’environ deux mille – j’ai également expérimenté la vidéo 360 degrés et la réalité virtuelle pendant la résidence. En utilisant un RICOH Theta S 360, j’ai créé des vidéos VR et 360 de l’intérieur du Château de l’Esparrou et des paysages nocturnes en basse lumière dans le vignoble.

Le concept d’utilisation de la vidéo VR et 360 était de créer une expérience personnelle intime en utilisant une nouvelle technologie d’imagerie. Parce qu’il n’y avait pas de perspective unique comme c’est le cas avec un appareil photo traditionnel, placer la lentille dans un endroit qui captait le sentiment de l’endroit est devenu un défi créatif inhabituel.

Une résidence inhabituelle

Dans d’autres résidences auxquelles j’ai assisté, comme Yaddo et Ucross, les artistes ont un studio pour travailler, une salle, des repas avec des dîners communautaires obligatoires – bref, une expérience partagée.Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Beach

Ce que j’ai vécu au château était plus un artiste en résidence: je travaillais seul, préparais mes propres repas, recevais un appartement à l’extérieur (la Méditerranée était de l’autre côté de la rue), recevais une voiture mais je n’avais pas un studio désigné. Cependant, on m’a donné une allocation pour les repas et autres dépenses et j’ai été payé pour aller et venir en France.

Aussi inhabituel était d’avoir le propriétaire du château là-bas, sur place. Cette connexion personnelle à l’endroit a apporté un niveau différent d’intimité à l’expérience – et mon travail. Bien qu’être artiste en résidence soit différent (et parfois seul), la liberté effrénée m’a permis de me concentrer complètement sur mon processus créatif.

Visite de Paris et réunion du musée contemporain

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Contemporary Museum MeetingAprès la résidence, j’ai pris le train de nuit pour Paris. J’étais un peu inquiet que je paraisse groggy et échevelé pour mon rendez-vous de matin avec un important conservateur de musée d’art contemporain, mais après un changement de chemises, je me suis bien senti.

La réunion s’est très bien passée et le conservateur a eu la gentillesse de recommander quatre autres contacts à Paris et en France qui pourraient être intéressés par mon travail. Je me suis mis à les poursuivre et à d’autres réunions à Paris avec des galeries pour les prochains jours, et je suis finalement retourné à New York après cinq semaines.

Inspiration de la peinture et du film

Avant mon départ pour la France, j’ai visité le Metropolitan Museum pour voir les paysagistes de Barbizon, tels que Théodore Rousseau et Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, et d’autres comme Frederic Edwin Church que j’aimais pour les paysages et la lumière atmosphérique. J’ai aussi vu des photographies d’Eugène Atget et d’Eugène Cuvelier. Ces peintures et photographies sont devenues inspirantes.

Soutien du projet

Le projet a été soutenu par l’Association des centres culturels de rencontre (ACCR), une organisation gouvernementale française qui promeut la diversité culturelle, et le Centre culturel de rencontre (CCR), qui soutient les artistes. En plus de me permettre de créer de nouveaux travaux, ils ont fourni le logement, le transport, une allocation et la production et l’exposition de photographies.

Merci au Château de l’Esparrou

J’ai aimé le temps passé là-bas. Avoir la liberté de créer de nouveaux travaux sans encombrement est un rêve pour n’importe quel artiste. Je suis reconnaissant au Château de l’Esparrou et surtout à Bertee, qui est propriétaire de la villa et du financement du gouvernement français.

Une seule personne

J’ai aimé le temps passé là-bas. Avoir la liberté de créer du nouveau travail sans être encombré est un rêve pour tout artiste. Je suis reconnaissant pour le Château de l’Esparrou et surtout pour Bertille de Swarte, qui y a grandi et le gère maintenant, ainsi que le financement du gouvernement français.

Exposition One Person

Voici une partie du travail – il y avait un total de quinze photographies encadrées 120x90cm- j’ai créé là au Château de l’Esparrou qui a été exposé comme un one person show en France à l’automne 2017.

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Lone TreeArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Totem PalmArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: PalmsArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees Yellowartist-in-residence-france-nightlandscape-photos-steve-giovinco_DSC3080Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Palm CenterArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Moon

Artiste en résidence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition en France

J’ai eu l’honneur d’être artiste en résidence en France et d’exposer le travail dans une exposition personnelle que j’ai faite là-bas.

En tant qu’artiste résidente, j’ai continué mes photographies nocturnes dans une villa du XIXème siècle en France. Au Château de l’Esparrou à Canet-en-Roussillon, j’ai travaillé pendant un mois à photographier la nuit financée par le gouvernement français, ACCR, ce qui a donné lieu à une exposition personnelle.

Photographier autour du château la nuit

Copy of 20170905_173412J’ai photographié au Château de l’Esparrou quelques après-midi et soirées, mais j’ai surtout travaillé dans les environs.

Cela comprenait la forêt et les sentiers juste derrière le château ainsi que les vastes vignobles et l’étang de Canet-Saint Nazaire, situé dans les Pyrénées-Orientales près de l’Espagne. A environ sept milles se trouvait la ville catalane de Perpignan.

Haunting Beauty et les changements environnementaux

Je voulais montrer la beauté obsédante de l’endroit la nuit, ainsi que me concentrer sur les changements environnementaux qui se produisent dans l’estuaire et le vignoble (cela est lié à mes autres projets photographiques récents axés sur le réchauffement climatique au Groenland et Broad Channel, Queens) . Des études récentes ont montré que la région a connu des conditions plus sèches et le vigneron a déclaré que les rendements étaient moins élevés.

Du crépuscule à 5 heures du matin

Habituellement, je travaillerais du crépuscule ou du coucher du soleil vers 4 heures du matin. Les expositions seraient d’environ 15 minutes à environ une heure et demie. Le clair de lune était étonnamment lumineux parfois, encadrant étrangement étranges ombres à travers les arbres et les vignes.

Marcher dans l’obscurité complète dans la peur

J'ai photographié au Château français de la nuit du 19ème siècle. C'est comme ça que ça ressemble luneJe me suis fasciné avec plusieurs ensembles de palmiers sur le terrain du Château de l’Esparrou. J’y retournerais nuit après nuit pour les photographier – ils ressemblaient à des totems ou des colonnes romaines. Je m’asseyais sur le sol de la forêt presque en méditation silencieuse en regardant et en créant des photos, le seul bruit étant des visites occasionnelles de curieux paquets de sangliers (sangliers en français – ils peuvent être un peu dangereux mais je ferais du bruit à les effrayer).

Je marcherais aussi dans l’obscurité totale jusqu’à l’estuaire de l’étang, à plusieurs kilomètres, où marcher pendant une heure était généralement une source de peur. Je me suis habitué à cela et d’autres promenades sur les motifs après un certain temps, cependant.

Routine de travail quotidienne

La routine quotidienne du mois consistait à créer de nouvelles photos la nuit.
En conséquence, mon temps passé en France était presque nocturne.

Habituellement, je me suis levé à midi, restant à peu près à l’heure de New York; passé en revue une partie du travail de la nuit précédente; flâné sur la plage de Canet-en-Roussillon pour réfléchir au tournage de la nuit prochaine; fait quelque chose de rapide à manger et emballé un sandwich pour plus tard; a conduit sept minutes pour «travailler» au château à 17 heures, photographié jusqu’à environ 22 heures ou minuit, prenant une pause repas sur un banc là-bas; continué à photographier à environ 4 heures du matin; retourné à l’appartement de la plage conduisant les rues vides pour télécharger les fichiers en s’assurant qu’ils sont en sécurité et intacts; et dirigé au lit à 5 heures du matin.

Ce processus a continué tous les jours – je suis devenu obsédé – à l’exception d’un quand j’étais trop fatigué pour travailler.

Diversion d’Art Picasso

Quelques fois, je me suis rendu dans la belle mais un peu graveleuse ville de Perpignan pour voir quelques expositions d’art, comme celle de Picasso, qui a vécu à Perpignan pendant quelques années. Je parlais rarement l’anglais au cours du mois.Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Perpignan

Préoccupations photographiques

Il y a eu plusieurs problèmes techniques à cause de l’obscurité presque complète que j’ai souvent photographiée. Le plus gros problème était la distorsion ou le bruit apparaissant dans les fichiers photographiques numériques, souvent dans les zones sombres d’ombre. En raison de la lumière extrêmement faible, les expositions devaient être très longues pour fournir un bon fichier non déformé. Un autre problème était parfois le vent qui pouvait déplacer le trépied légèrement, ce qui rend l’image floue. En conséquence, l’accentuation d’Adobe Camera Raw et Photoshop – toujours importante – est devenue particulièrement cruciale.

Exposition de photos de nuit du château

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, ShowEnviron deux semaines et demie dans la résidence, j’ai commencé à préparer une exposition prévue pour une semaine plus tard.

J’ai rapidement regardé à travers environ un millier de photos que j’avais prises à ce jour, réduisait la sélection à quinze impressions grand format 120x80cm / 48 “x40”, que j’ai éditées, corrigées et aiguisées. Ceux-ci ont ensuite été imprimés, montés et encadrés pour une exposition d’une personne – normalement un processus qui peut prendre trois mois à un an, mais en raison des contraintes de temps, a été comprimé jusqu’à environ une semaine.

Le spectacle a été présenté dans un magnifique espace d’exposition stable du XVIIe siècle dans le quartier historique de Canet. De nombreuses personnes sont venues, avec des représentants du gouvernement local; J’ai fait un bref discours en français brisé.

Autre travail: Vidéo VR et 360

Au-delà des photographies numériques – le nombre total de prises pendant les quatre semaines était d’environ deux mille – j’ai également expérimenté la vidéo 360 degrés et la réalité virtuelle pendant la résidence. En utilisant un RICOH Theta S 360, j’ai créé des vidéos VR et 360 de l’intérieur du Château de l’Esparrou et des paysages nocturnes en basse lumière dans le vignoble.

Le concept d’utilisation de la vidéo VR et 360 était de créer une expérience personnelle intime en utilisant une nouvelle technologie d’imagerie. Parce qu’il n’y avait pas de perspective unique comme c’est le cas avec un appareil photo traditionnel, placer la lentille dans un endroit qui captait le sentiment de l’endroit est devenu un défi créatif inhabituel.

Une résidence inhabituelle

Dans d’autres résidences auxquelles j’ai assisté, comme Yaddo et Ucross, les artistes ont un studio pour travailler, une salle, des repas avec des dîners communautaires obligatoires – bref, une expérience partagée.Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Beach

Ce que j’ai vécu au château était plus un artiste en résidence: je travaillais seul, préparais mes propres repas, recevais un appartement à l’extérieur (la Méditerranée était de l’autre côté de la rue), recevais une voiture mais je n’avais pas un studio désigné. Cependant, on m’a donné une allocation pour les repas et autres dépenses et j’ai été payé pour aller et venir en France.

Aussi inhabituel était d’avoir le propriétaire du château là-bas, sur place. Cette connexion personnelle à l’endroit a apporté un niveau différent d’intimité à l’expérience – et mon travail. Bien qu’être artiste en résidence soit différent (et parfois seul), la liberté effrénée m’a permis de me concentrer complètement sur mon processus créatif.

Visite de Paris et réunion du musée contemporain

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Contemporary Museum MeetingAprès la résidence, j’ai pris le train de nuit pour Paris. J’étais un peu inquiet que je paraisse groggy et échevelé pour mon rendez-vous de matin avec un important conservateur de musée d’art contemporain, mais après un changement de chemises, je me suis bien senti.

La réunion s’est très bien passée et le conservateur a eu la gentillesse de recommander quatre autres contacts à Paris et en France qui pourraient être intéressés par mon travail. Je me suis mis à les poursuivre et à d’autres réunions à Paris avec des galeries pour les prochains jours, et je suis finalement retourné à New York après cinq semaines.

Inspiration de la peinture et du film

Avant mon départ pour la France, j’ai visité le Metropolitan Museum pour voir les paysagistes de Barbizon, tels que Théodore Rousseau et Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, et d’autres comme Frederic Edwin Church que j’aimais pour les paysages et la lumière atmosphérique. J’ai aussi vu des photographies d’Eugène Atget et d’Eugène Cuvelier. Ces peintures et photographies sont devenues inspirantes.

Soutien du projet

Le projet a été soutenu par l’Association des centres culturels de rencontre (ACCR), une organisation gouvernementale française qui promeut la diversité culturelle, et le Centre culturel de rencontre (CCR), qui soutient les artistes. En plus de me permettre de créer de nouveaux travaux, ils ont fourni le logement, le transport, une allocation et la production et l’exposition de photographies.

Merci au Château de l’Esparrou

J’ai aimé le temps passé là-bas. Avoir la liberté de créer de nouveaux travaux sans encombrement est un rêve pour n’importe quel artiste. Je suis reconnaissant au Château de l’Esparrou et surtout à Bertee, qui est propriétaire de la villa et du financement du gouvernement français.

Une seule personne

J’ai aimé le temps passé là-bas. Avoir la liberté de créer du nouveau travail sans être encombré est un rêve pour tout artiste. Je suis reconnaissant pour le Château de l’Esparrou et surtout pour Bertille de Swarte, qui y a grandi et le gère maintenant, ainsi que le financement du gouvernement français.

Exposition One Person

Voici une partie du travail – il y avait un total de quinze photographies encadrées 120x90cm- j’ai créé là au Château de l’Esparrou qui a été exposé comme un one person show en France à l’automne 2017.

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Lone TreeArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Totem PalmArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: PalmsArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees Yellowartist-in-residence-france-nightlandscape-photos-steve-giovinco_DSC3080Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Palm CenterArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Moon

Artiste en résidence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition en France

J’ai eu l’honneur d’être artiste en résidence en France et d’exposer le travail dans une exposition personnelle que j’ai faite là-bas.

En tant qu’artiste résidente, j’ai continué mes photographies nocturnes dans une villa du XIXème siècle en France. Au Château de l’Esparrou à Canet-en-Roussillon, j’ai travaillé pendant un mois à photographier la nuit financée par le gouvernement français, ACCR, ce qui a donné lieu à une exposition personnelle.

Photographier autour du château la nuit

Copy of 20170905_173412J’ai photographié au Château de l’Esparrou quelques après-midi et soirées, mais j’ai surtout travaillé dans les environs.

Cela comprenait la forêt et les sentiers juste derrière le château ainsi que les vastes vignobles et l’étang de Canet-Saint Nazaire, situé dans les Pyrénées-Orientales près de l’Espagne. A environ sept milles se trouvait la ville catalane de Perpignan.

Haunting Beauty et les changements environnementaux

Je voulais montrer la beauté obsédante de l’endroit la nuit, ainsi que me concentrer sur les changements environnementaux qui se produisent dans l’estuaire et le vignoble (cela est lié à mes autres projets photographiques récents axés sur le réchauffement climatique au Groenland et Broad Channel, Queens) . Des études récentes ont montré que la région a connu des conditions plus sèches et le vigneron a déclaré que les rendements étaient moins élevés.

Du crépuscule à 5 heures du matin

Habituellement, je travaillerais du crépuscule ou du coucher du soleil vers 4 heures du matin. Les expositions seraient d’environ 15 minutes à environ une heure et demie. Le clair de lune était étonnamment lumineux parfois, encadrant étrangement étranges ombres à travers les arbres et les vignes.

Marcher dans l’obscurité complète dans la peur

J'ai photographié au Château français de la nuit du 19ème siècle. C'est comme ça que ça ressemble luneJe me suis fasciné avec plusieurs ensembles de palmiers sur le terrain du Château de l’Esparrou. J’y retournerais nuit après nuit pour les photographier – ils ressemblaient à des totems ou des colonnes romaines. Je m’asseyais sur le sol de la forêt presque en méditation silencieuse en regardant et en créant des photos, le seul bruit étant des visites occasionnelles de curieux paquets de sangliers (sangliers en français – ils peuvent être un peu dangereux mais je ferais du bruit à les effrayer).

Je marcherais aussi dans l’obscurité totale jusqu’à l’estuaire de l’étang, à plusieurs kilomètres, où marcher pendant une heure était généralement une source de peur. Je me suis habitué à cela et d’autres promenades sur les motifs après un certain temps, cependant.

Routine de travail quotidienne

La routine quotidienne du mois consistait à créer de nouvelles photos la nuit.
En conséquence, mon temps passé en France était presque nocturne.

Habituellement, je me suis levé à midi, restant à peu près à l’heure de New York; passé en revue une partie du travail de la nuit précédente; flâné sur la plage de Canet-en-Roussillon pour réfléchir au tournage de la nuit prochaine; fait quelque chose de rapide à manger et emballé un sandwich pour plus tard; a conduit sept minutes pour «travailler» au château à 17 heures, photographié jusqu’à environ 22 heures ou minuit, prenant une pause repas sur un banc là-bas; continué à photographier à environ 4 heures du matin; retourné à l’appartement de la plage conduisant les rues vides pour télécharger les fichiers en s’assurant qu’ils sont en sécurité et intacts; et dirigé au lit à 5 heures du matin.

Ce processus a continué tous les jours – je suis devenu obsédé – à l’exception d’un quand j’étais trop fatigué pour travailler.

Diversion d’Art Picasso

Quelques fois, je me suis rendu dans la belle mais un peu graveleuse ville de Perpignan pour voir quelques expositions d’art, comme celle de Picasso, qui a vécu à Perpignan pendant quelques années. Je parlais rarement l’anglais au cours du mois.Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Perpignan

Préoccupations photographiques

Il y a eu plusieurs problèmes techniques à cause de l’obscurité presque complète que j’ai souvent photographiée. Le plus gros problème était la distorsion ou le bruit apparaissant dans les fichiers photographiques numériques, souvent dans les zones sombres d’ombre. En raison de la lumière extrêmement faible, les expositions devaient être très longues pour fournir un bon fichier non déformé. Un autre problème était parfois le vent qui pouvait déplacer le trépied légèrement, ce qui rend l’image floue. En conséquence, l’accentuation d’Adobe Camera Raw et Photoshop – toujours importante – est devenue particulièrement cruciale.

Exposition de photos de nuit du château

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France, ShowEnviron deux semaines et demie dans la résidence, j’ai commencé à préparer une exposition prévue pour une semaine plus tard.

J’ai rapidement regardé à travers environ un millier de photos que j’avais prises à ce jour, réduisait la sélection à quinze impressions grand format 120x80cm / 48 “x40”, que j’ai éditées, corrigées et aiguisées. Ceux-ci ont ensuite été imprimés, montés et encadrés pour une exposition d’une personne – normalement un processus qui peut prendre trois mois à un an, mais en raison des contraintes de temps, a été comprimé jusqu’à environ une semaine.

Le spectacle a été présenté dans un magnifique espace d’exposition stable du XVIIe siècle dans le quartier historique de Canet. De nombreuses personnes sont venues, avec des représentants du gouvernement local; J’ai fait un bref discours en français brisé.

Autre travail: Vidéo VR et 360

Au-delà des photographies numériques – le nombre total de prises pendant les quatre semaines était d’environ deux mille – j’ai également expérimenté la vidéo 360 degrés et la réalité virtuelle pendant la résidence. En utilisant un RICOH Theta S 360, j’ai créé des vidéos VR et 360 de l’intérieur du Château de l’Esparrou et des paysages nocturnes en basse lumière dans le vignoble.

Le concept d’utilisation de la vidéo VR et 360 était de créer une expérience personnelle intime en utilisant une nouvelle technologie d’imagerie. Parce qu’il n’y avait pas de perspective unique comme c’est le cas avec un appareil photo traditionnel, placer la lentille dans un endroit qui captait le sentiment de l’endroit est devenu un défi créatif inhabituel.

Une résidence inhabituelle

Dans d’autres résidences auxquelles j’ai assisté, comme Yaddo et Ucross, les artistes ont un studio pour travailler, une salle, des repas avec des dîners communautaires obligatoires – bref, une expérience partagée.Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Beach

Ce que j’ai vécu au château était plus un artiste en résidence: je travaillais seul, préparais mes propres repas, recevais un appartement à l’extérieur (la Méditerranée était de l’autre côté de la rue), recevais une voiture mais je n’avais pas un studio désigné. Cependant, on m’a donné une allocation pour les repas et autres dépenses et j’ai été payé pour aller et venir en France.

Aussi inhabituel était d’avoir le propriétaire du château là-bas, sur place. Cette connexion personnelle à l’endroit a apporté un niveau différent d’intimité à l’expérience – et mon travail. Bien qu’être artiste en résidence soit différent (et parfois seul), la liberté effrénée m’a permis de me concentrer complètement sur mon processus créatif.

Visite de Paris et réunion du musée contemporain

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Contemporary Museum MeetingAprès la résidence, j’ai pris le train de nuit pour Paris. J’étais un peu inquiet que je paraisse groggy et échevelé pour mon rendez-vous de matin avec un important conservateur de musée d’art contemporain, mais après un changement de chemises, je me suis bien senti.

La réunion s’est très bien passée et le conservateur a eu la gentillesse de recommander quatre autres contacts à Paris et en France qui pourraient être intéressés par mon travail. Je me suis mis à les poursuivre et à d’autres réunions à Paris avec des galeries pour les prochains jours, et je suis finalement retourné à New York après cinq semaines.

Inspiration de la peinture et du film

Avant mon départ pour la France, j’ai visité le Metropolitan Museum pour voir les paysagistes de Barbizon, tels que Théodore Rousseau et Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, et d’autres comme Frederic Edwin Church que j’aimais pour les paysages et la lumière atmosphérique. J’ai aussi vu des photographies d’Eugène Atget et d’Eugène Cuvelier. Ces peintures et photographies sont devenues inspirantes.

Soutien du projet

Le projet a été soutenu par l’Association des centres culturels de rencontre (ACCR), une organisation gouvernementale française qui promeut la diversité culturelle, et le Centre culturel de rencontre (CCR), qui soutient les artistes. En plus de me permettre de créer de nouveaux travaux, ils ont fourni le logement, le transport, une allocation et la production et l’exposition de photographies.

Merci au Château de l’Esparrou

J’ai aimé le temps passé là-bas. Avoir la liberté de créer de nouveaux travaux sans encombrement est un rêve pour n’importe quel artiste. Je suis reconnaissant au Château de l’Esparrou et surtout à Bertee, qui est propriétaire de la villa et du financement du gouvernement français.

Une seule personne

J’ai aimé le temps passé là-bas. Avoir la liberté de créer du nouveau travail sans être encombré est un rêve pour tout artiste. Je suis reconnaissant pour le Château de l’Esparrou et surtout pour Bertille de Swarte, qui y a grandi et le gère maintenant, ainsi que le financement du gouvernement français.

Exposition One Person

Voici une partie du travail – il y avait un total de quinze photographies encadrées 120x90cm- j’ai créé là au Château de l’Esparrou qui a été exposé comme un one person show en France à l’automne 2017.

Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Lone TreeArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Totem PalmArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: PalmsArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Trees Yellowartist-in-residence-france-nightlandscape-photos-steve-giovinco_DSC3080Artist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Palm CenterArtist-in-Residence, Rhapsodic Night Landscape Photographs and Exhibition in France: Moon